817EM015-015F.jpg
817EM015-015F.jpg

BATTLECRUISER FAST BATTLESHIP HARUNA

SUPER DRAWINGS IN 3D N. 15

Codice: 817EM015015

€ 30,00

Collana in lingua inglese pubblicata dalla Kagero in Polonia. Ogni volume interamente illustrato con decine di disegni tridimensionali che rivelano ogni particolare e dettaglio della nave presa in esame (del ponte, delle torrette, degli armamenti, del radar, del sistema delle comunicazioni, ecc.). L’agile testo fornisce le principali notizie sull’origine, sviluppo e impiego della nave mentre svariate tabelle forniscono i dati tecnici relativi alla nave e ai suoi armamenti.

Haruna, named after Mount Haruna, was a warship of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War I and World War II. Designed by the British naval engineer George Thurston, she was the fourth and last battlecruiser of the Kongō class, among the most heavily armed ships in any navy when built. Laid down in 1912 at the Kawasaki Shipyards in Kobe, Haruna was formally commissioned in 1915 on the same day as her sister ship, Kirishima. Haruna patrolled off the Chinese coast during World War I. During gunnery drills in 1920, an explosion destroyed one of her guns, damaged the gun turret, and killed seven men. During her life, Haruna underwent two major reconstructions. Beginning in 1926, the Imperial Japanese Navy rebuilt her as a battleship, strengthening her armor and improving her speed and power capabilities. In 1933, her superstructure was completely rebuilt, her speed was increased, and she was equipped with launch catapults for floatplanes. Now fast enough to accompany Japan's growing carrier fleet, Haruna was reclassified as a fast battleship. During the Second Sino-Japanese War, Haruna transported Imperial Japanese Army troops to mainland China before being redeployed to the Third Battleship Division in 1941. On the eve of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, she sailed as part of the Southern Force in preparation for the Battle of Singapore.

Lingua

INGLESE

Illustrazioni

Interamente illustrato 

ISBN
9788362878383

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